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The Last Assignment

October 10, 2014 00:53 by phil

Back in November last year, my eldest son and I popped over to the Insomnia Gaming Festival in Telford to take part in a game jam organised by Global GameCraft. (Today I  bumped into the source again on a USB stick).

The theme for the day was “The Last Assignment”. We decided to go with a text based adventure game loosely based on the Dirty Harry movie.

With just 7 hours on the clock we managed to put together quite a fun adventure game with ambient sound and graphics:

The Last Assignment - Start Screen

and picked up the prize for best storyline!

The Last Assignment - Insomnia Telford

Given the time constraints I decided to build the dialogue as a simple state machine using coroutines. In this scenario C# was my go to language as it provides basic iterator block support and a first class goto statement.

By building the game dialogue as a simple state machine I was able test it from the start as a console app and later easily integrate it into a graphical environment.

Here’s the state machine for the rookie scene:

public static IEnumerable<State> Rookie()
{
   yield return new State(
         "One way or another this will be your last assignment.\r\n" +
         "Just 2 weeks left on the force before you retire.\r\n" +
         "Back at the police station",
         "You get a black coffee and a donut",
         "A chai latte and a cup cake") { Theme="70s reflective;bullpen"};
   if (Choice.Taken == 2) goto imposter;
   yield return new State(
         "Your new partner introduces himself.",
         "You give him a stern look",
         "Ignore him") { Theme = "70s reflective;bullpen" };
   yield return new State(
         "\"Why do they call ya 'Dirty Harry'?\"",
         "Make up your own mind kid",
         "Turn up your eye brow"
         ) { Theme = "70s reflective;bullpen" };
   yield break;
imposter:
   Game.Ended = true;
   yield return new State(
         "You have been exposed as an imposter.\r\n" +
         "Cops don't chai latte, keep it real!")
         { Theme = "end game mp3;bullpen" };
}

 

which looked like this:

Rookie Scene

If you fancy having a play, the source for the game as a console app is available here:

Have fun!


Tags:
Categories: Basic | C#
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Oops

October 7, 2014 14:27 by phil

Are you working in the enterprise?

Do you find yourself, day-in-day-out, up to the eyeballs in unmaintainable code?

Does the once beautiful architecture now more closely resemble a big ball of mud, that no amount of tooling will dig you out of?

What can you do?

1) Bury your head in the sand

head-in-the-sand

A very popular option, you just need to keep practising denial.

2) Turn to drink

gazza

Another popular option, although unfortunately this strategy is only likely to last as long as your liver.

3) Become a scrum master

scrum master

This is an easy way out, scrum certification is just a 2 day course away, but there’s probably no looking back.

4) Admit there’s a problem

AA

This is one of the hardest and least popular options, but possibly the most rewarding.

Start by saying out loud: “Object Oriented Programming is an expensive disaster which must end” and then take each new day as it comes.


Tags:
Categories: C# | C++ | Java
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C# 6 Cuts

October 2, 2014 00:21 by phil

In a recent thread on CodePlex Mads Torgeson, C# Language PM at Microsoft, announced 2 of the key features planned for C# 6 release have now been cut:

  • Primary constructors
  • Declaration expressions

According to Mads:

They are both characterized by having large amounts of downstream work still remaining.

primary constructors could grow up to become a full-blown record feature

Reading between the lines Mads seems to be saying the features weren’t finished and even if they were they seemed to conflict with a potential record feature currently being prototyped.

The full thread is here: Changes to the language feature set

Language Design

I think there’s two distinct options when adding new features to an existing language with a large user base:

  • upfront design
  • implement incrementally

Upfront design should mean that all cases are met but comes at a time-to-market cost, where as an incremental implementation means quick releases with the potential risk of either sub-optimal syntax or backward compatibility issues when applying more features.

It appeared at the high level that the C# team’s had initially opted for the incremental option. The feature cuts however suggest to me that there may have been a change in direction towards more upfront design.

Primary Constructors

The primary constructors feature was intended to reduce the verbosity of C#’s class declaration syntax. The new feature appeared to be inspired by F# ’s class syntax.

If you like the idea of a lighter syntax for class declarations then you may just want to try F# which already has a well thought out mature implementation, i.e.

type Person(name:string, age:int) =
    member this.Name = name
    member this.Age = age

Or for simple types use the even simpler record type:

type Person = { Name:string, Age:int }

Note: on top of lighter class syntax F# also packs a whole raft of cool features not available in C#, including powerful pattern matching and data access via Type Providers.

Declaration Expressions

Declaration expressions was again designed to reduce verbosity in C# providing a lighter syntax for handling out parameters. Out parameters are used in C# to allow a method to return multiple values:

int result;
bool success = Int32.TryParse("123", out result);

Again handling multiple return values is handled elegantly in F# which employs first-class tuples, i.e.

let success, value = Int32.TryParse("123")

As shown above, C# out parameters can be simply captured in F# as if the method were returning multiple values as a tuple.

Conclusion

The first time I saw Mads publicly announce the now cut primary constructor syntax and declaration expressions was nearly a year ago at NDC London. At the time the features were announced with a number of disclaimers that they may not actually ship. I think in future it may be better for everyone to take those disclaimers with more than just a pinch of salt.


Tags:
Categories: C# | F# | .Net
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