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F#unctional Londoners 2014

September 21, 2014 13:40 by phil

2014 has been another crazy year for the F#unctional Londoners meetup with over 20 sessions already. Thanks to our hosts Skills Matter we’ve been able to hold a meetup roughly once every 2 weeks.

Here’s a run down of the year so far and what’s coming up.

January

Ross kicked off the year with a deep dive to his LINQ enabled erasing SQL Type Provider.

Following on, in May, Ross left the sunny shores of Southend to tour the east coast with the talk covering NYC, Washington DC and Nashville along the way.

sql-provider

First seen at DunDDD in Dundee, Anthony’s excellent talk went on to be featured at CodeMesh London too.

With F# built-in to Xamarin Studio you can easily target iOS, Android and Mac.

February

Tomas returned to London to talk about his work on Deedle while at Blue Mountain Capital in New York.

As a follow on from the talk Tomas ran a hands on session using Deedle to explore world climate, the titanic, stock market trends and finally US debt.

March

There was a huge turnout for Scott’s hugely informative and at times somewhat amusing talk first seen at NDC London.

set phasers to null

Eirik Tsarpalis and Jan Dzik, from Nessos, presented their work on MBrace a programming model and cluster infrastructure for effectively defining and executing large scale computation in the cloud.

In this hands on treasure hunt session, Tomas presented a series of data extraction tasks using type providers to find words to build a sentence.

April

Rob Lyndon introduced Deep Belief Networks and his GPU based implementation in Vulpes. This talk was repeated last week at the prestigious Strangeloop conference in St Louis!

May

Michael travelled up from Brighton for a hands on session on building type providers. Type Providers are a hot topic in the London group with a number of popular type providers produced by members including FSharp.Data, SQLProvider and Azure Storage.

Mixing biology and physics to understand stem cells and cancer (video)

Ben Hall from Microsoft Research Cambridge gave a fascinating talk about his work with a hybrid simulator in F# to explore how stem cells grow (and some worms!).

Stephen Channell gave a repeat of his excellent talk featured at FP Days and the F# in Finance conference on liquidity risk.

Ian was in town to run a session at the Progressive .Net Tutorials and gave a repeat of his excellent talk from DDD North.

June

F#unctional Londoners regular Isaac, aka the Cockney Coder, talked about his professional work with Azure including his Azure Storage type provider.

In this hands on session we used the material from Mathias Brandewinder’s session in San Francisco to have some fun drawing fractal trees.

In this session Gabriele Cocco talked about his work on FSCL, an F# to OpenCL compiler.

July

Borrowing material from Mathias again, we built a 2048 bot using the open source web testing library Canopy.



Grant popped down from Leeds to run a fun code golf session where the aim was to complete a task with the least number of characters.

August

Phil Nash talked about how he was using F# scripting at work along side his some of his C++ projects.

In this hands on session we looked at the popular parser combinator library FParsec, building a mini-Logo parser and interpreter.

September

James popped down from Edinburgh to talk about his work with Philip Wadler on the open source project FSharp.Linq.ComposableQuery.

Goswin Rothenthal talked about his work using FSharp scripting in the design of the Abu Dhabi Louvre building:

Coming up this Wednesday we have Evelina talking about some of her data science work at Cambridge.

November

On November 6-7th the Progressive F# Tutorials make a return with expert speakers including Don Syme, Tomas Petricek, Mark Seemann, Andrea Magnorsky, Michael Newton, Jérémie Chassaing, Mathias Brandewinder, Scott Wlaschin and Robert Pickering.

ProgFSharp2014Don’t miss the special offer that runs up to the end of Evelina’s talk giving a 20% discount to members, brining the price down to a barmy 200GBP, use code F#UNCTIONAL-20.


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Categories: F# | .Net | Mono
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FsiBot: Assorted Tweets

September 20, 2014 09:23 by phil

FsiBot is a cloud hosted bot that evaluates F# expressions in mentions, built by Mathias Brandewinder. Underneath it uses the Twitter API, F# Compiler Services all hosted on Azure.

In the beginning the F# community put a lot of effort into bringing it down testing it’s security. Nowadays it’s become more of a creative outlet for code golf enthusiasts showcasing all sorts from ASCII Art to math.

Christmas Tree

Tomas’s tree first appeared before @fsibot was cool or for that matter even existed:


Circle

An early attempt at ASCII art, the trick in Twitter is to use characters that are roughly the same width:


Invader

Along similar lines this expression uses a bitmap to produce an ASCII invader:


FSharp Logo

Here Mathias uses the same technique to generate a logo:


Bar chart

This expression charts Yes vs No in the recent vote on Scottish Independence:


Sequences

The hailstone sequence:


Pi

Interesting Pi approximation using dates:


Inception

Evaluating an F# expression inside an F# expression:


Rick Roll

The thing about a rick roll is that no-one should expect it:


Magic 8-Ball

Based on magic 8-ball here's a somewhat abridged version:


Have fun!


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Categories: F# | Twitter
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DDD East Anglia 2014

September 13, 2014 16:50 by phil

This Saturday saw the Developer Developer Developer! (DDD) East Anglia conference in Cambridge. DDD events are organized by the community for the community with the agenda for the day set through voting.

T-Shirts

The event marked a bit of a personal milestone for me, finally completing a set of DDD regional speaker T-Shirts, with a nice distinctive green for my local region. Way back in 2010 I chanced a first appearance at a DDD event with a short grok talk on BDD in the lunch break at DDD Reading. Since then I’ve had the pleasure of visiting and speaking in Glasgow, Belfast, Sunderland, Dundee and Bristol.

Talks

There were five F# related talks on the day, enough to fill an entire track:

Tomas kicked off the day, knocking up a simple e-mail validation library with tests using FsUnit and FsCheck. With the help of Project Scaffold, by the end of the presentation he’d generated a Nuget package, continuous build with Travis and Fake and HTML documentation using FSharp.Formatting.

Anthony’s SkyNet slides are already available on SlideShare:


ASP.Net was also a popular topic with a variety of talks including:

All your types are belong to us!

The title for this talk was borrowed from a slide in a talk given by Ross McKinlay which references the internet meme All your base are belong to us.

You can see a video of an earlier incarnation of the talk, which I presented at NorDevCon over on InfoQ, where they managed to capture me teapotting:

teapot

The talk demonstrates accessing a wide variety of data sources using F#’s powerful Type Provider mechanism.

The World at your fingertips

The FSharp.Data library, run by Tomas Petricek and Gustavo Guerra, provides a wide range of type providers giving typed data access to standards like CSV, JSON, XML, through to large data sources Freebase and the World Bank.

With a little help from FSharp.Charting and a simple custom operator based DSL it’s possible to view interesting statistics from the World Bank data with just a few key strokes:


The JSON and XML providers give easy typed access to most internet data, and there’s even a branch of FSharp.Data with an HTML type provider providing access to embedded tables.

Enterprise

The SQLProvider project provides type access with LINQ support to a wide variety of databases including MS SQL Server, PostgreSQL, Oracle, MySQL, ODBC and MS Access.

FSharp.Management gives typed access to the file system, registry, WMI and Powershell.

Orchestration

The R Type Provider lets you access and orchestrate R packages inside F#.

With FCell you can easily access F# functions from Excel and Excel ranges from F#, either from Visual Studio or embedded in Excel itself.

The Hadoop provider allows typed access to data available on Hive instances.

There’s also type providers for MATLAB, Java and TypeScript.

Fun

Type Providers can also be fun, I’ve particularly enjoyed Ross’s Choose Your Own Adventure provider and more recently 2048:

2048 

Write your own Type Provider

With Project Scaffold it’s easier than ever to write and publish your own FSharp type provider. I’d recommend starting with Michael Newton’s Type Provider’s from the Ground Up article and video of his session at Skills Matter.

You can learn more from Michael and others at the Progressive F# Tutorials in London this November:

DDD North

The next DDD event is in Leeds on Saturday October 18th, where I’ll be talking about how to Write your own Compiler, hope to see you there :)


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Categories: .Net | F# | C# | Software Craftsmanship
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